Church tradition definitely not brittle - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Church tradition definitely not brittle

ALVA, OK (KWWL) - Many churches across the country have their own unique traditions that come into play around the holidays.

A Methodist church in Oklahoma is no different.

If you want to make 500 pounds of peanut brittle, it's better to think like a contractor than a confectioner.

That's why a whole team of workers show up at Alva's First Methodist Church around this time, to mix raw peanuts, sugar and corn syrup... cook it up to almost 300 degrees, stir in vanilla and real butter and spread it out to cool.

Fred Newman started this tradition in the church basement more than half a century ago. He had a boys' choir back then, and a good recipe for peanut brittle.

Fred says, "There's a man here in Alva that made peanut brittle during World War II and we use his recipe. Colonel Kirkbride was this guy's name."

Fred thought it might make a good fundraiser, and a tradition was born.

"It's kind of a Christmas tradition. Seems like you never eat peanut brittle in July!"

Fred retired from directing his choir, but the church took over, and Fred stayed to direct this sticky ensemble. Among his recruits are former boys' choir members, church folk and even dentists.

The brittle cools overnight. The next day, customers in Alva start ordering.

The batches hardly ever last more than a week. Fred Newman was on to something when he was starting this candy making tradition.

"The years go by so fast, it's hard to tell. It seems like we just started."

wn unique traditions that come into play around the holidays.

A Methodist church in Oklahoma is no different.

If you want to make 500 pounds of peanut brittle, it's better to think like a contractor than a confectioner.

That's why a whole team of workers show up at Alva's First Methodist Church around this time, to mix raw peanuts, sugar and corn syrup... cook it up to almost 300 degrees, stir in vanilla and real butter and spread it out to cool.

Fred Newman started this tradition in the church basement more than half a century ago. He had a boys' choir back then, and a good recipe for peanut brittle.

Fred says, "There's a man here in Alva that made peanut brittle during World War II and we use his recipe. Colonel Kirkbride was this guy's name."

Fred thought it might make a good fundraiser, and a tradition was born.

"It's kind of a Christmas tradition. Seems like you never eat peanut brittle in July!"

Fred retired from directing his choir, but the church took over, and Fred stayed to direct this sticky ensemble. Among his recruits are former boys' choir members, church folk and even dentists.

The brittle cools overnight. The next day, customers in Alva start ordering.

The batches hardly ever last more than a week. Fred Newman was on to something when he was starting this candy making tradition.

"The years go by so fast, it's hard to tell. It seems like we just started."

Online Producer:  Adam Amdor

Powered by Frankly