Trump Says He’ll Have More on ‘Wiretapping’ Claim Soon - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Trump Says He’ll Have More on ‘Wiretapping’ Claim Soon

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(NBC) -

President Donald Trump said in an interview that aired Wednesday that his administration will present more information "soon" about his allegations that President Barack Obama wiretapped his phone before the election.

"Frankly, we have a lot" of evidence to support his series of tweets on March 4 drawing comparisons between Obama and the Watergate scandal, the president said in an interview on Fox News Channel's "Tucker Carlson Tonight."

Trump said his administration would be "submitting things before the committee very soon," an apparent reference to the House Intelligence Committee.

Trump said he couldn't disclose what the administration would offer. "It's right now before the committee, and I think I want to leave it," Trump said. "I have a lot of confidence in the committee."

"But I think we have some very good stuff," he said.

The Intelligence Committee's leaders, Republican Chairman Devin Nunes and ranking Democrat Adam Schiff, both of California, said Wednesday that they plan to ask FBI Director James Comey about Trump's allegations at a hearing next week.

Trump's tweeted allegations this month were met with widespread skepticism from Republicans and Democrats alike. Nunes and Schiff told reporters Wednesday that they had seen no evidence to support Trump's claims, which a spokesman for Obama called "simply false."

Trump suggested in the Fox News interview that he hadn't meant that the Obama administration literally tapped his telephone in Trump Tower last year, saying: "Those words were in quotes. That really covers — because wiretapping is pretty old-fashioned stuff. But that really covers surveillance and many other things."

Trump's second tweet on March 4, however, didn't use quotation marks around the phrase "tapp my phones," as he spelled it.

Carlson didn't ask Trump about the discrepancy, but he did ask whether, in general, the president could damage his credibility by tweeting "something that cannot be proved or is demonstrably untrue."

"I have my own form of media," Trump said. "So if I tweet two or three or four or five times a day, and if most of them are good, and I really want them all to be good, but if I make one mistake in a month — this one I don't think is going to prove to be a mistake at all."

He added: "Maybe I wouldn't be here if it wasn't for Twitter, because I get such a fake press, such a dishonest press."

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