Study suggests possible link between prenatal vitamins and autis - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Study suggests possible link between prenatal vitamins and autism

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CEDAR FALLS (KWWL) -

Cedar Falls mom Christa Lotts is the proud mom of six beautiful children.

She has a 10-month-old baby and her eldest child has autism. When she was pregnant, prenatal vitamins were part of her daily routine.

"It was as my physician directed, and I really didn't think twice about it," she said. 

Inside prenatal vitamins: folic acid. 

A study done by students at UNI and professor Dr. Darrell Wiens suggests too much folic acid could contribute to autism in kids. 

"For the people who are having kids right now, I am nervous because I don't want them to not take folic acid," Lotts said. 

Dr. Wiens agrees. He suggests pregnant women keep taking prenatal vitamins, but watch how much folic acid is in their diets. 

He says, "You still need folic acid, but you don't need really high levels. Establishing an upper limit once your past the first month, that would be a good idea." 

But this study is in its beginning stages. 

"The most important thing we need now is more research," Dr. Wiens says. 

"The fact that people are continuing to research it is reassuring to me. That it's still out there and people are trying to help these kids," Lotts says. 

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An eastern Iowa professor found something he's warning pregnant women to look out for. 

A study done by students and professor Dr. Darrell Wiens at UNI suggests too much of a good thing could be bad.

The group looked at folic acid, a common element in prenatal vitamins.

The study suggests too much folic acid in pregnant women could contribute to autism in kids.

Dr. Wiens says he does not want this to worry moms.

He wants them to keep taking prenatal vitamins during their first month of pregnancy, but after that they should watch how much folic acid is in their diets. He suggests they talk to their doctors or a pharmacologist about this and what the proper amount of folic acid is to them. 

The study is in the beginning stages.Dr. Wiens says more research still needs to be done.

He says with diagnosis of autism on the rise, it's important that people keep looking into whats going on.

According to the CDC, currently one in 68 children have been identified with autism spectrum disorder.

To read more about the study, click here

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