AEDs praised for saving wrestler's life - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

AEDs praised for saving wrestler's life

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It was a scary couple minutes at the state wrestling tournament, when Creston/Orient-Macksburg's Tayler Pettit collapsed after his match. Within moments, he was hooked up to an Automated External Defibrillator (AED), which likely saved his life.

"When they hooked him up to it, he was in an irregular (heart) rhythm," said Dr. Dennis Zachary of Family Sports Medicinene. "They gave him a shock and had to give him several shocks by the time they got him to the hospital."

Thursday, doctors at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines upgraded Pettit's condition from 'Critical' to 'Serious.'

The Iowa State High School Athletic Association said the AED used belonged to Wells Fargo Arena.

"And yes, it did save someone's life yesterday, thank goodness," said Dr. Anthony Pappas, athletic director for Waterloo West High.

Pappas said the district keeps AEDs in every building, with one on every floor of West.

"It's very conveniently located so we can get to it as quick as we can to save someone's life," Pappas said.

He said there's no state law requiring them at schools or athletic events, but in a case where seconds matter, they want to be ready.

West High athletic trainer Dave Fricke said they are relatively easy to use, even with very little training.

"Yesterday, it showed it was a pretty effective treatment," he said.

The devices uses audio cues and diagrams to guide users through the process.

Pappas said they cost between $800-1000 each.

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