Crews not finding ethanol in Mississippi River after train wreck - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Crews not finding ethanol in Mississippi River after train wreck

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DUBUQUE COUNTY (KWWL) -

Crews are whipping up and down the Mississippi River near Dubuque testing for ethanol. Most days, they conduct somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 tests.

So far, the results have been good.

"For the most part, they're not seeing any ethanol anymore in the river at all, except for up at the actual spill site. There's still some hits up there," said Scott Gritters, a fisheries biologist with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

They have monitoring sites set up from the site of the train derailment, just north of Dubuque. They have stations set up every 6,000 feet.

Gritters said as they continue to get more data back, they'll shrink the area that they test, but they will continue testing.

"I don't see it ending anytime real soon, but we'll try to let the data drive that decision," he said.

The testing has also showed the level of dissolved oxygen to be normal. That means that most aquatic life shouldn't be affected by the spill.

They're also doing their best to monitor aquatic life, but a frozen river prevents them from getting a good grasp on the full situation.

"We use cameras in other backwaters to make sure the fish are swimming and not dead under the ice. And I can tell the places we've been, we've seen the fish," Gritters said.

They'll be able to better assess the impact on aquatic life once the spring comes, and the ice melts.

In the meantime, Gritters said they want anyone who sees anything that may be out of the ordinary to call their office.

"The more eyes we can get on this thing, the better," he said.

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