Scientists use fishing line, thread to make artificial muscles - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Scientists use fishing line, thread to make artificial muscles

Updated: Feb 20, 2014 02:49 PM
  • Health Connections - Featured Health SpecialistsHealth PartnersMore>>

  • Scott Pharmacy

    Scott Pharmacy


    Scott Pharmacy, Inc. is a privately owned and operated business that has served the residents of Fayette County for more than 30 years. We are loyal to our patients.
    More >>

    Scott Pharmacy, Inc. is a privately owned and operated business that has served the residents of Fayette County for more than 30 years. We are loyal to our patients and will ensure that your order is filled quickly and correctly.
    More >>
  • Cedar Valley Medical Specialists

    Cedar Valley Medical Specialists


    Cedar Valley Medical Specialists, P.C. represents more than 60 providers in 20+ medical fields. By working together, the professional providers of Cedar Valley Medical Specialists, P.C. have focused our delivery
    More >>
    Cedar Valley Medical Specialists, P.C. represents more than 60 providers in 20+ medical fields. By working together, the professional providers of Cedar Valley Medical Specialists, P.C. have focused our delivery of quality healthcare on you and your family.More >>

THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fishing line and sewing thread can create powerful artificial muscles that could be used to help disabled people or to build incredibly strong robots, a new study says.

Compared to human muscle of the same weight and length, the artificial muscles can lift 100 times more weight and make 100 times more mechanical power, the international team of researchers claimed.

The artificial muscles -- which are created by twisting and coiling high-strength polymer fishing line and thread -- generate 7.1 horsepower per kilogram. That's about the same mechanical power as a jet engine, according to the study published Feb. 21 in the journal Science.

Temperature changes power the muscles and these changes can be produced a number of ways: electrically, by the absorption of light or by the chemical reaction of fuels, the scientists said.

"The application opportunities for these polymer muscles are vast," study corresponding author Ray Baughman, chair in chemistry at the University of Texas at Dallas and director of the NanoTech Institute, said in a university news release.

"Today's most advanced humanoid robots, [artificial] limbs and wearable exoskeletons are limited by motors and hydraulic systems, whose size and weight restrict dexterity...," among other things, he said.

Along with providing incredible strength in devices such as robots and exoskeletons, these artificial muscles could be used to improve the fine-movement capabilities of minimally invasive robotic microsurgery, the researchers said. In addition, they potentially could be used to power miniature "laboratories on a chip" and to relay the sense of touch from sensors on a robotic hand to a human hand.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about artificial limbs.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KWWL. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.

Persons with disabilities who need assistance with issues relating to the content of this station's public inspection file should contact Administrative Assistant Sandy Youngblut at 319-291-1259. Questions or concerns relating to the accessibility of the FCC's online public file system should be directed to the FCC at 888-225-5322, at 888-835-5322 (TTY) or at fccinfo@fcc.gov.