Iowa Flood Center partners with NASA for unprecedented project - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Iowa Flood Center partners with NASA for unprecedented project

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The Iowa Flood Center on the University of Iowa's campus is embarking on a project that could have significant implications for communities around the world. The Iowa Flood Center on the University of Iowa's campus is embarking on a project that could have significant implications for communities around the world.
IOWA CITY (KWWL) -

The Iowa Flood Center on the University of Iowa's campus is embarking on a project that could have significant implications for communities around the world.

The Flood Center is partnering with NASA until mid-June to study the dynamics of flooding.

Mother Nature is unpredictable, as evidenced by last week's torrid rains over a short amount of time.

"Last week in this local area, it was incredible how fast the creeks were rising," said Dan Ceynar, a design engineer with the Iowa Flood Center.

Plenty is unknown about the nature of flooding.

Researchers are continuing to try to understand some of the most pressing questions.

"Is it going to rain?  How much is it going to rain?  If you're in a flood plain, is the water going to make it to my property?" Ceynar said.

The partnership with NASA could go a long way in filling in some of the gaps.

"It's going to be just an unprecedented set of data," Ceynar said.

The NASA project, called Iowa Flood Studies, enlists the Iowa Flood Center's help in better understanding worldwide rain events.

Hundreds of sophisticated instruments from NASA and the IFC are being set up on basins in central and northeastern Iowa to measure rainfall.

The information learned on the ground will help provide a more accurate picture for a NASA satellite radar set to launch next year.

"It's really exciting in terms of understanding the precipitation dynamics and the physics of the event," Ceynar said. 

Information learned from the mission can help researchers understand better where the water on our planet goes.

It's knowledge that can help limit the devastation in the event of future flooding.

"We may never have exact answers for that, but anything we can answer for that (will) help people prepare," Ceynar said.

To learn more, visit the Iowa Flood Center's web site by clicking here.

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