Cascade neighbors worried about water tower overflow - KWWL - Eastern Iowa Breaking News, Weather, Closings

Cascade neighbors worried about water tower overflow

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CASCADE (KWWL) -- Some people in Cascade are concerned about the overflow from a city water tower running through their backyards.

Several homeowners on the odd-numbered side of Seventh Avenue Southwest in Cascade took their complaints Monday night to the city council meeting.

City administrator Randy Lansing said the city overfills this particular water tower two to three times per year, as required by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

"We have to do that because the tower fills from the bottom to the top," Lansing said, "so the top water just sits there, and, from time to time, we overfill it so that the water that's at the top flows out, and we get fresh water in the tower."

Lansing said this is nothing new.

"The tower was built in 1984, so it's been there 25 years, long before any of the houses that are there today were built."

Some neighbors said the combination of a rainy summer plus the overfilling has resulted this year in constantly-saturated ground and standing water.

The odd-numbered houses on the street have a slope leading down to their backyards, a slope on the other side leading into their backyards and the drainage from a farmer's field plus the water tower. They said heavy rains saturate the ground, but the added water tower water is, as one man said, "the feather that broke the camel's back."

One woman said she was concerned about standing water as breeding grounds for mosquitos, especially with her kids playing outside.

The last fully-completed overfill was back in late spring, Lansing said.

When the city started its most recent flush this month, residents on Seventh Avenue Southwest complained. As a result, the city halted the overflow process.

One neighbor said he'd like to see an agitator put in the tower, to avoid the problem of stagnant water altogether. He said other options include installing an underground pipe that would channel the water to an existing nearby storm sewer.

Not every neighbor agrees with the degree of concern. One man said his was the first house on the street and that he doesn't have any problem with the water that comes through his property. He said he expected that when he moved in, and the water tower runoff hasn't caused him any alarm.

Online Reporter: Becca Habegger

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